First of All, Remember always to use latest version of Electrum Wallet. To Update this simply download the installer and then run it on your computer.

Do not worry, You will not lose any coins But Do Not Forget To Write Down on Paper Your Seed. The Program files and your currency folders are in separetly directories so you will not lose your coins when you will update the wallet. You can even uninstall and then download again your electrum wallet.

How to verify GPG signatures

GPG signatures are a proof that distributed files have been signed by the owner of the signing key. For example, if this website was compromised and the original Electrum files had been replaced, signature verification would fail, because the attacker would not be able to create valid signatures. (Note that an attacker would be able to create valid hashes, this is why we do not publish hashes of our binaries here, it does not bring any security).

In order to be able to verify GPG signatures, you need to import the public key of the signer. Electrum binaries are signed with ThomasV’s public key. On Linux, you can import that key using the following command: gpg --import ThomasV.asc. Here are tutorials for Windows and MacOS. When you import a key, you should check its fingerprint using independent sources, such as here, or use the Web of Trust.

Notes for Windows users. Electrum binaries are often flagged by various anti-virus software. There is nothing we can do about it, so please stop reporting that to us. Anti-virus software uses heuristics in order to determine if a program is malware, and that often results in false positives. If you trust the developers of the project, you can verify the GPG signature of Electrum binaries, and safely ignore any anti-virus warnings. If you do not trust the developers of the project, you should build the binaries yourself, or run the software from source. Finally, if you are really concerned about malware, you should not use an operating system that relies on anti-virus software.